Blog (page 2 of 5)

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COP21 Paris-First Impression

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Being at The COP21 Paris, I feel so grateful to meet people with the same concern about climate change. It is a great opportunity for us to tell young voice to change our perspective and move together to slow down climate change!

Sven Plögers supports Youth4Planet

Sven Plöger is german meterologist, tv weather forecaster and book author. His topics include climate change and environmentalism. He is very well known in Germany for his presence in the tv with his daily weather forecast and also with his participations on debates on climate issues. We are very proud of his support! Thanks Sven!

This video is in German language.

Youth4Planet at the Responsible Business Forum

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On the 4th of November, Kevin and I were invited to represent the Youth4Planet team at the Responsible Business Forum for Sustainable Development. As a science student, I personally never thought to attend, let alone speak, at a business forum. So you can well imagine how honoured I felt to be given the chance to share my opinion on sustainability and my experience in the Arctic to a room full of amazing world innovators and entrepreneurs.


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Listening to what each of them have done / will do to attain sustainability in their companies were really inspiring. It made me very hopeful and believe this year will be our turning point for a better future. I was really surprised at the amount of positive responds we got from the audience as well. It seemed like everyone’s really interested in our project and truly believe the youth generation’s voices need to be taken into account. I simply can’t wait to see what decisions will be made at the COP21 this December.
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Seeing through the haze: Why we must protect Borneo’s forests

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I recently returned home from South-East Asia after presenting at the 2015 Asia for Animals conference, as well as visiting friends of mine who work on the ‘frontline’ in wildlife protection.

Anyone who’s visited South-East Asia recently will tell you that there’s one thing you immediately notice — the smog. Indonesia is burning, and the consequences of widespread forest fires across much of the nation is being felt heavily across Borneo and many other parts of South-East Asia.

Forest fires have become a quick and easy method of clearing forests in the region. The deforested land is often used to grow plantations that produce palm oil — an ingredient found in about half of all supermarket products throughout Australia, Europe and Northern America.

The impacts of Indonesia’s fires aren’t just being felt locally. As forests our the lungs of our world, absorbing and storing carbon dioxide, burning them will continue to boost the amount of greenhouse gas in the atmosphere in more ways than one — which is the last thing our planet needs.

Amidst the thick haze, however, I witnessed once again Borneo’s natural beauty, and I wanted to share some images I took. Seeing these incredible fauna and flora, and momentarily forgetting about the smog, offered a critical reminder of why we need to protect this precious place — and why destroying it for the sake of profit can never be right.


If you would like to learn more about the issue of deforestation for palm oil, you might like to head to my site — SayNotoPalmOil.com

Back in Germany – How I feel now

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Back in Germany I did notice that i finally got my idea of distance back! You don’t have any clue in Greenland about distance so that an envisaged 15 minutes way can take up to one hour or even more. In addition the ambient noise is totally different what is easy to imagine. Cars, the subway and roadworks are the daily sound effects in Germany.

Especially in conversations with my class, with my family or in other groups where nature or the climatic change was part in I feel more certain to comment. Furthermore I noticed that I intervene more often when friends don’t show respect for Nature and the raw materials they bought by throwing rubbish on the ground or throwing plastic bottles in the bin instead for recycling them because it is more convenience. (In Germany you get like 0,28$ per bottle!) What really is noticeable is that particularly the point of convenience is a thorn in the flesh of the improvement in climate change. If the most convenience way was the environmentally friendly one we would have less problems right now.

It is our assignment to get people out of their convenience in which they are right now and to find new ways to make actions for nature more easy and attractive. What really caught my attention in school was when we learned about so called „Nudges“ in economy class. A Nudge should affect the behavior and action of people without them noticing. A succeeded example for a Nudge is that the rubbish on danish streets got reduced for about 40% just by drawing green footprints on the ground who tend to guide to public garbage cans. Nudges find more uses by changing for example the former habits like reduce the wastage of paper by printing double-paged. Printers can therefore be set on double-page from the first. Only people who have an objection against has to change the setup then. Summarized, Nudges are changing habits and are improving them in many ways.

Right now it is important to teach young people and children more and earlier about the topic of climate change and the consequences and also what to do to help.

For the people who already have their own (selfish) opinion about the importance of nature and a lifestyle my message is: turn off your egoism. We are not the only creatures on planet earth and we have the responsibility for the future generations!

Did you know…

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Greenland is the 12th largest country in the world, with a size of 2,166,086 square kilometers, making it the world’s largest island that is not a continent. But also Greenland is one of the least densely populated countries in the world, with a population of approximately 57,000. 

landscapeMost of Greenland (about 81%) is covered in ice, except for a narrow strip of coastline around the island, where all Greenland’s cities are located.

The Greenland Ice Sheet is the second largest ice sheet on Earth, behind the Antarctic Ice sheet. The weight of the ice sheet had caused much of Greenland to sink about 300 meters below sea level!

The Greenland Ice Sheet is the second largest ice sheet on Earth, behind the Antarctic Ice sheet. The weight of the ice sheet had caused much of Greenland to sink about 300 meters below sea level!

 

Green exploration in the Arctic

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We were lucky enough to be given the chance to stay at a hostel which is own by the world renown polar explorer, Ramon Hernando. Travellers from 10 different countries shared the place. Ramon is known for exploring the Arctic and the Antarctic by using a wind powered sled, which he designed himself. He designed his first wind-sled in the early 21st century, and from then on, it kept evolving. His latest design has 3 parts in it, a transparent tent in the front of the sled for the driver, a supply tent right behind it for equipments and resources, and another tent at the back for people to work and sleep in. He combines the old technology of the Inuit sled with the modern technology of incorporating wind energy. The design is so simple that not a lot of people are interested in it, commenting on it as if it’s not high-tech enough. He feels that using clean energy is the new era of exploration.

A combination of ancient and futuristic technologies is the new way to attain sustainability in this world. Our ancestors knew what they were doing when they first explored the planet. The difference is, their way was only sustainable in their era alone, when global population was not even half of the current status. With rising global population, we can’t simply follow the old ways and assume the planet will still be able to sustain them. I believe the current youth generation has the capability to innovate the old ways into a much a sustainable version for our world.

Climate change – a worldwide problem

About one week ago we came together as a group of 5 people from 3 countries. A mixed group from Australia, Indonesia and Germany. But why is it so important to be that international? It is because we are all affected by climate change, but each of us in a different way. We all have similar fears because we all suffer from it in a special way.

Even when Germany is not one of the countries which is being affected the most by climate change (due to its location in the temperate zone), changes happen. Except for the year 2003, 2015 was one of the hottest years in Germany with a big and long heatwave and record-breaking temperatures from about 36 degrees. This also means that the harvest times for farmers, e.g. for the wine growing will change. Soil erosion will get worse and storm tides will happen more often.

One of the worst things due to climate warming is that the Asian tiger mosquito, which can transfer illnesses like malaria, reached Germany this year.

Aedes Albopictus - the tiger mosquito can be infectous with Malaria and reached germany for the first time this year

Australia is already affected more and stronger by climate change by droughts, tropical cyclones, sea-level rise, heatwaves, bushfires and heavy rainfall. Heatwaves have become longer and hotter. The number of record hot days in Australia has already doubles since the 1990s! Those hotter and drier conditions have contributed to increase bushfire weather risk in southeast Australia. That means that the continued increases in hot and dry weather will likely increase the frequency of extreme fire danger days. In southwest and southeast Australia droughts are also likely to happen more often.

Global sea level has risen 0.2m over the last century and still continues. This will drive major impacts to costal cities.

Indonesia is also hit very hard by climate change. Such as severe droughts, annual floods and intense tropical storms. Floods in Jakarta used to be once every 5 years, but now it is every year.

The increase in seawater temperature is causing major stress on Indonesia’s marine life. Coral bleaching has been spotted throughout Indonesian waters. Deforestation has cause more soil erosion and mud floods across Indonesia’s rural areas as well.

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