Posts, that were tagged with "Day 3"

Do not let this culture melt

old man watchingEven in the coldest, most isolated places a rich culture can be found. The Greenlandic Inuits have lived on the ice for over 45,000 years. During our travels we were gifted an insight into this ancient yet adapted life style of residents in Nuuk. Young children played soccer in the playgrounds as old man watch over their streets and oceans.

The first Greenlandic man I spoke to told me “the word Inuit means hunters, we are hunters” he said smiling up at the ice. With that I realised that living among these frozen oceans and hunting such well adapted animals requires a great depth of learning and teaching. Wisdom seems to be as apparent as the ice here. have a lot to learn and a lot to see.

There is strong pride in the hearts of the the indigenous people here, and their identities reflect their skilled hunting practices and traditions. The landscape provides a sort of freedom I’ve never felt before, distracting my mind from the unnecessary pressures and expectations of modern society that just last week I held so closely.

Our common humanity

On boarding our flight in Nuuk yesterday morning, we noticed a small face peering through the circular plane window. She was a sweet little girl – most likely two years old – travelling with her mother to Kangerlussuaq.

During take off, the little girl burst into tears. She was terrified of the fast propellers on each side of the small 30-seater aircraft. In her state of fear and distress, I showed her some pictures on my phone and she began to relax. I found out her name was Livi.

Livi is an indigenous person, or ‘Inuit’, of Greenland. She didn’t speak any English (and I can’t speak a word of Greenlandic!), but we ended up playing for over an hour. Livi’s fear completely dissolved once we began playing games.

It’s experiences like this that remind me of our common humanity – the desire we all share to be happy and connected, and live free from fear and suffering. Meeting Livi also reminded me of the reason we are on this trip. Addressing climate change is a responsibility shared by people of all ages and nationalities, and a challenge we can only overcome by working together. Through recognising our shared humanity, we can dissolve cultural barriers and unite to create the kind of world we want to live in.

Because at the end the day, no matter where you come from or what language you speak, we all seek to live safe, happy and free lives – and tackling our climate crisis is fundamental in fulfilling that desire.

The arctic is..?

Arriving in the arctic. What do each of the earthTeam members say about it? Also we met Jason Box.