Posts, that were tagged with "Kangerlussuaq"

Our common humanity

On boarding our flight in Nuuk yesterday morning, we noticed a small face peering through the circular plane window. She was a sweet little girl – most likely two years old – travelling with her mother to Kangerlussuaq.

During take off, the little girl burst into tears. She was terrified of the fast propellers on each side of the small 30-seater aircraft. In her state of fear and distress, I showed her some pictures on my phone and she began to relax. I found out her name was Livi.

Livi is an indigenous person, or ‘Inuit’, of Greenland. She didn’t speak any English (and I can’t speak a word of Greenlandic!), but we ended up playing for over an hour. Livi’s fear completely dissolved once we began playing games.

It’s experiences like this that remind me of our common humanity – the desire we all share to be happy and connected, and live free from fear and suffering. Meeting Livi also reminded me of the reason we are on this trip. Addressing climate change is a responsibility shared by people of all ages and nationalities, and a challenge we can only overcome by working together. Through recognising our shared humanity, we can dissolve cultural barriers and unite to create the kind of world we want to live in.

Because at the end the day, no matter where you come from or what language you speak, we all seek to live safe, happy and free lives – and tackling our climate crisis is fundamental in fulfilling that desire.

Day 1: Let the journey to the arctic region begin!

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Two days of preparation in Hamburg are behind us. Finally we met the whole team and all of our earthTeamMembers (Kevin, Delphine, Kalinda, Nesha & Thomas) in Copenhagen to give the final start for Youth4Arctic 2015.

After a quick breakfast in the hotel, we rushed to the airport for our 9 am flight from Copenhagen to Kangerlussuaq/Greenland. It took us about 4 hours and we crossed 4 timezones, so we arrived at 9 am again. We took a walk around town and visited the museum about the military history of Kangerlussuaq. Even though it was cold, it was very nice to walk around with fresh air surrounding us. Kangerlussuaq is located right on the Arctic circle, and we noticed that there was still vegetation around us. Since the arctic circle follows the tree line, it was interesting to see that there is still bush vegetation on the arctic circle.

We had a local free range organic cage free muskox burger for lunch. Unfortunately our plane that was expected to depart at 1:20 pm, got delayed for more than 4 hours. This gave us some time to brainstorm about the project. Finally, we left Kangerlussuaq around 4:30 pm. The expected journey was about 45 minutes, but it went up to nearly 3 hours because we could not land directly due to the fog above Nuuk. Plane rides to Nuuk often have this problem because the fog is kinda normal for that area due to the high moisture wind coming from the sea.

Nuuk

After our arrival in Nuuk at around 7 pm we checked in at the hotel. That wraps up the day, we’re going to get some rest now and we shall continue the story tomorrow.

 

written by Nesha and Delphine