Posts, that were tagged with "Nasarssuaq"

Nature knows no borders

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When you think about trees, the high arctic isn’t the first image that will pop into your head, let alone tree planting. You might be surprise to hear that some parts of Greenland do have trees. Although they are usually very small and don’t grow very tall due to the harsh climatic condition. In recent years, Greenland’s ice sheet has been retreating up north due to climate change. This increase in temperature, especially in south greenland and the coastal region, has caused a massive growth spurs on the trees around the area.

In the past year, there has been a program to plant more trees in Greenland, for the sake of helping mother nature along in climate change. Young trees which grow on similar temperature and condition in other parts of the world have been transported to greenland for replantation. There has been a total of around 300.000 trees planted in the forest area of Nasarssuaq.

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Prof. Jason Box has personally bought 2000 trees from the US and wanting to plant them in the amount of time we were there. With the help of forestry students from the University of Copenhagen, whom are having the same project of planting 15000 trees in a span of 10 days, we were able to plant all 2000 trees in just 5 days. It was not an easy task as this was a job done by not more than 20 people in total, but the feeling of knowing that in 5 years, those baby trees will grow big enough to reduce the carbon dioxide in our atmosphere, was heartwarming.

Planting trees is one of the easiest thing we can do for the planet right now. I personally reckon that it doesn’t matter whether you’re planting trees in your home or foreign country, mother nature knows no borders, your tree will still be acknowledge. So lets start getting those hands dirty shall we.

Icebergs up ahead!

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Finally arriving at Nasarssuaq, we noticed how the bay is completely packed with icebergs from the fjords. The locals mentioned that they never had so many icebergs during this time of year in the last few decades.

As we were crossing the bay to reach our hostel, the Lief Kensington hostel, we passed a few giant icebergs along the way. The group’s impression on it started of with more excitement than worry, since all of us have never seen this sort of sightings before.

After settling in our hostel, we decided to head to the nearest fjord/valley, where the icebergs were born, to document the whole situation on camera. Towering to about 10m in the air, we were overwhelmed by the gigantic size of these bergs. We began to noticed how difficult it was to navigate through the icebergs. not only did the captain had to watched out for normal icebergs, there were black ice half submerged in the water as well, which is transparent ice that are hard to spot and can easily be hit.

This unusual event was simply due to the amount of rain they had this season, which is cause by an increase in the warming of the ocean. Rain causes the glacials to have cracks in their structure, which in turn produces more icebergs.

Hearing about this, I remembered my flight attendant mentioning that Nuuk had 8 months of snow this year. Climate change has caused the areas in Greenland to have much severe winter and warmer summer. In other words, a colder winter and more icebergs to navigate through in the summer.